Autoparts

26 August 2015

Fascia often refers to the decorative panels of a car's dashboard,[1] or the entire dashboard assembly.[2][3]

Regulations affecting bumper design in the late 1970s saw the increasing use of soft plastic materials on the front and rear of vehicles. Fascia was adopted then as the term to describe these soft areas,[4] but is now increasingly used as a general term for a car's set of front-end components: grille, headlamps, front bumper, and other details

 

Fascia often refers to the decorative panels of a car's dashboard,[1] or the entire dashboard assembly.[2][3]

Regulations affecting bumper design in the late 1970s saw the increasing use of soft plastic materials on the front and rear of vehicles. Fascia was adopted then as the term to describe these soft areas,[4] but is now increasingly used as a general term for a car's set of front-end components: grille, headlamps, front bumper, and other details

 

Fascia often refers to the decorative panels of a car's dashboard,[1] or the entire dashboard assembly.[2][3]

Regulations affecting bumper design in the late 1970s saw the increasing use of soft plastic materials on the front and rear of vehicles. Fascia was adopted then as the term to describe these soft areas,[4] but is now increasingly used as a general term for a car's set of front-end components: grille, headlamps, front bumper, and other details

Fascia often refers to the decorative panels of a car's dashboard,[1] or the entire dashboard assembly.[2][3]

Regulations affecting bumper design in the late 1970s saw the increasing use of soft plastic materials on the front and rear of vehicles. Fascia was adopted then as the term to describe these soft areas,[4] but is now increasingly used as a general term for a car's set of front-end components: grille, headlamps, front bumper, and other details

 

Fascia often refers to the decorative panels of a car's dashboard,[1] or the entire dashboard assembly.[2][3]

Regulations affecting bumper design in the late 1970s saw the increasing use of soft plastic materials on the front and rear of vehicles. Fascia was adopted then as the term to describe these soft areas,[4] but is now increasingly used as a general term for a car's set of front-end components: grille, headlamps, front bumper, and other details

 

Fascia often refers to the decorative panels of a car's dashboard,[1] or the entire dashboard assembly.[2][3]

Regulations affecting bumper design in the late 1970s saw the increasing use of soft plastic materials on the front and rear of vehicles. Fascia was adopted then as the term to describe these soft areas,[4] but is now increasingly used as a general term for a car's set of front-end components: grille, headlamps, front bumper, and other details

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